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Most Google Accounts Don’t Use Two-Factor Authentication

The New Google Account Protection: Is it Worth It?

The two-factor authentication process is for those who need the extra security for their Google accounts. The ironic thing is, many Google users have yet to consider using it for their accounts.

Why Not?

According to an engineer at Google, the percentage of those who have adopted the process so far is less than 10%. Users are afraid to take the leap to a larger scale. The two-factor offers the type of protection users want from hackers, but does not seem to make a difference because the convenience they are used to is gone.

Your Account

You enter your password and a special code to access your account. The special code is sent to your phone. The mere fact that the code is being sent to your phone is a reason for many of you to say “no”. Users feel there is too much hassle and do not want to deal with it.

Other Reasons Why Users Are Not Embracing Two-Factor Authentication

First, you are not comfortable sharing information, such as telephone number, with an online service. You may have been hacked by less-effective protection before. You feel as though you are not willing to take the chance. Google understands that and they are working on ways to resolve it. Some of you might take a lot longer to convince than others will. Once you get hacked, you lose your trust in a lot of things.

The Hard Facts

Online data goes through thousands of hands every day. Google is doing its best to offer great options, options that will hopefully convince you to move forward with the protection. Only time will tell whether or not they work through their fears and embrace what Google is offering.

Sympathy Quotes that Will Help You Reminisce the Past

Without the feeling of sympathy, we can’t understand what others truly feel, which will make it hard for us to create a deeper connection with friends and family.

Sympathy Quotes

Today, we’re going to provide you some Sympathy Quotes that will help you understand the power of sympathy to building a tighter emotional relationship.

  1.    “No one has yet realized the wealth of sympathy, the kindness and generosity hidden in the soul of a child. The effort of every true education should be to unlock that treasure.” – Emma Goldman
  2.    “When our bodies are sick and people extend their sympathy, bring us soup, offer up solutions. When our minds are sick, people tend to shy away from you, be afraid, or call you outright crazy. I’m fascinated by the way society and individuals view mental illness, and most of my shorts comment on that.” – Anna Akana
  3.    “Deliberately seek opportunities for kindness, sympathy, and patience.” – Evelyn Underhill
  4.    “I’ve always thought of acting as more of an exercise in empathy, which is not to be confused with sympathy. You’re trying to get inside a certain emotional reality or motivational reality and try to figure out what that’s about so you can represent it.” – Edward Norton
  5.    “You develop a sympathy for all human beings when you travel a lot.” – Shakuntala Devi
  6.    “Learning a foreign language, and the culture that goes with it, is one of the most useful things we can do to broaden the empathy and imaginative sympathy and cultural outlook of children.” – Michael Gove
  7.    “What is the meaning of ‘gossip?’ Doesn’t it originate with sympathy, an interest in one’s neighbor, degenerating into idle curiosity and love of tattling? Which is worse, this habit, or keeping one’s self so absorbed intellectually as to forget the sufferings and cares of others, to lose sympathy through having too much to think about?” – Lucy Larcom
  8.    “Pity may represent little more than the impersonal concern which prompts the mailing of a check, but true sympathy is the personal concern which demands the giving of one’s soul.” – Martin Luther King, Jr.
  9.    “And whoever walks a furlong without sympathy walks to his own funeral drest in his shroud.” – Walt Whitman
  10.    “It’s hard to penetrate characters who are very cut off and lack empathy and to do it with sympathy. It’s so easy to make a damaged character repugnant.” – Siri Hustvedt
  11.    “Sympathy is two hearts tugging at one load.” – Charles Henry Parkhurst
  12.    “It is only after one is in trouble that one realizes how little sympathy and kindness there are in the world.” – Nellie Bly
  13.    “To desire and expect nothing for oneself and to have profound sympathy for others is genuine holiness.” – Ivan Turgenev
  14.    “It is in our faults and failings, not in our virtues, that we touch each other, and find sympathy. It is in our follies that we are one.” – Jerome K. Jerome
  15.    “All sympathy not consistent with acknowledged virtue is but disguised selfishness.” – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  16.    “As human beings, we all have reasons for our behavior. There may be people who have certain physiological issues that dictate why they make certain choices. On the whole, though, I think we’re dictated by our structure, our past, our environment, our culture. So once you understand the patterns that shape a person, how can you not find sympathy?” – Forest Whitaker
  17.    “The community stagnates without the impulse of the individual. The impulse dies away without the sympathy of the community.” – William James
  18.    “The rule of friendship means there should be mutual sympathy between them, each supplying what the other lacks and trying to benefit the other, always using friendly and sincere words.” – Marcus Tullius Cicero
  19.    “It’s not very interesting to establish sympathy for people who, on the surface, are instantly sympathetic. I guess I’m always attracted to people who, if their lives were headlines in a newspaper, you might not be very sympathetic about them.” – John Irving
  20.    “Interest does not tie nations together; it sometimes separates them. But sympathy and understanding does unite them.” – Woodrow Wilson
  21.    “A person who has sympathy for mankind in the lump, faith in its future progress, and desire to serve the great cause of this progress, should be called not a humanist, but a humanitarian, and his creed may be designated as humanitarianism.” – Irving Babbitt
  22.    “We do not learn by inference and deduction and the application of mathematics to philosophy, but by direct intercourse and sympathy.” – Richard M. Nixon
  23.    “There is something terribly morbid in the modern sympathy with pain. One should sympathise with the colour, the beauty, the joy of life. The less said about life’s sores the better.” – Oscar Wilde
  24.    “Sympathy is the first condition of criticism.” – Henri Frederic Amiel
  25.    “What is it that distinguishes you and me from the lower animals – from the beasts? More, I say, than anything else, human sympathy – human sympathy.” – Robert Green Ingersoll
  26.    “Character is made of duty and love and sympathy, and, above all, of living and working for others.” – Robert Green Ingersoll
  27.    “We’re so much more likely to feel sympathy for an animal than another person; thus, the best fiction uses animals to define truly humane behavior.” – Chuck Palahniuk
  28.    “Sympathy constitutes friendship; but in love there is a sort of antipathy, or opposing passion. Each strives to be the other, and both together make up one whole.” – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
  29.    “The more sympathy you give, the less you need.” – Malcolm Forbes
  30.    “I’m constantly amazed by the ability a child has to show sympathy, to read emotions, to get to the heart of any situation. It’s unfiltered and completely inspiring.” – David Duchovny
  31.    “Sympathy is one of the principles most widely rooted in our nature: we rejoice to see ourselves reflected in another; and, perversely enough, we sometimes have a secret pleasure in seeing the sin which dwells in ourselves existing under a deformed and monstrous aspect in another.” – William Godwin
  32.    “Sympathy relies on a common experience. If you’re clumsy, you might have sympathy for others who tend to bump into things. Empathy, on the other hand, is the ability to understand another person’s feelings even if you’ve never experienced them yourself.” – Joe Gebbia
  33.    “I learnt pity, sympathy, and what it was like to be at the other end of the stick. Such lessons can’t be learnt in lecture halls.” – Lionel Blue
  34.    “You have to take strength from the people that love you and the people that love Barbara and the huge number of expressions of sympathy and compassion and support. That has been extremely moving.” – Ted Olson
  35.    “But what you could perhaps do with in these days is a word of most sincere sympathy. Your movement is carried internally by so strong a truth and necessity that victory in one form or another cannot elude you for long.” – Hjalmar Schacht
  36.    “Any relations in a social order will endure, if there is infused into them some of that spirit of human sympathy which qualifies life for immortality.” – George William Russell
  37.    Extend sympathy, empathy and compassion to others. – Vishnu
  38.    It is by a wise economy of nature that those who suffer without change, and whom no one can help, become uninteresting. Yet so it may happen that those who need sympathy the most often attract it the least. – F. H. Bradley
  39.    However you choose to show sympathy – that you know someone is experiencing a loss and that you care – is almost always better than saying and doing nothing. Your response, whether verbal, written, or visual, provides an indication that you care about other people. – Carol Fredericks Ebeling
  40.    Sympathy extended to another is the expression of the human heart demontrating that love is true and wholesome. – Byron R. Pulsifer
  41.    A good condolence note: acknowledges the person’s loss; expresses your sympathy; in certain cases, it comforts. – Florence Isaacs
  42.    Write a sympathy note full of memories. Perhaps you have a special memory from a visit or a past holiday you can mention. You can also relay any funny anecdotes you remember from school or teen years, or holidays or work. Sharing memories for the family is a lovely thing to do. Sometimes the family learn new things about their loved one that they never knew. – Elizabeth Postle
  43.    The strongest bond of human sympathy outside the family relation should be one uniting working people of all nations and tongues and kindred’s. – Abraham Lincoln
  44.    “Sympathy does not think. It acts. It acts to remove the ceaseless sufferings of the world.” – Sri Chinmoy
  45.    “There should be a sympathy with freedom, a desire to give it scope, founded not upon visionary ideas, but upon the long experience of many generations within the shores of this happy isle, that in freedom you lay the firmest foundations both of loyalty and order.” – William E. Gladstone
  46.    “Autumn wins you best by this, its mute appeal to sympathy for its decay.” – Robert Browning
  47.    “Sympathy does not think. It acts. It acts to remove the ceaseless sufferings of the world.” – Sri Chinmoy
  48.    “Kindliness and sympathy, fellowship and understanding, are always good, but best when they come from a distant corner of the world.” – Archibald Hill
  49.    “Developing our sympathetic compassion is not only possible but the only reason for us to be here on earth.” – George Saunders
  50. “Men we shall have only as we make manhood the object of the work of the schools – intelligence, broad sympathy, knowledge of the world that was and is, and of the relation of men to it – this is the curriculum of that Higher Education which must underlie true life.” – W. E. B. Du Bois
  51. “When you’re successful, people have no sympathy. Nobody wants to catch the tears of a millionaire.” Boy George
  52. “Two nations between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other’s habits, thoughts, and feelings, as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets. The rich and the poor.” – Benjamin Disraeli

Final Thought

For you to create a deeper and tighter relationship with your loved ones, you should always have sympathy with them. Do your best to understand them emotionally. You can ask them what’s going on and how do they feel. Make sure to completely understand what they truly feel – put their situation into yours and try to comfort them during the hard times.

Of course, make sure to listen to what others say and don’t interrupt them! After all, listening enables you to communicate effectively with other people. Be comfortable with them so that they can be comfortable with you, too. Open your heart and mind to other people to get to know them better. The power of sympathy is what you need to create a more open and deeper connections to anyone.